Expectancy effects and strength training: do steroids make a difference?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2173/13266
Title:
Expectancy effects and strength training: do steroids make a difference?
Authors:
Maganaris, Constantinos N.; Collins, David J.; Sharp, Martin
Citation:
Sport psychologist, 2000, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 272-278
Publisher:
Human Kinetics
Publication Date:
Sep-2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2173/13266
Additional Links:
http://www.humankinetics.com/TSP
Abstract:
Although expectancy has been shown to play a role in the effect of Anabolic Steroids (AS) on behavior, little research has been completed on the potential for parallel effects on performance. This is an important area for investigation because if expectancy effects can be shown to operate by improvements in performance through the administration of a placebo, arguments against the use of AS may be more successfully advanced. Accordingly, the present investigation used the administration of a placebo (saccharine) with competitive power lifters, using false information about the nature of the drug to delineate expectancy effects. The pervasiveness of these effects was further examined by disclosing the true nature of the drug to half of the participants, midway through the investigation. Notable improvements in performance associated with the belief that AS had been administered largely dissipated when athletes were informed as to the true nature of the drug. Results indicated that expectancy played a notable role in performance enhancement. Implications for this work include more effective use of such investigations in the fight against doping in sport.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Full-text of this article is not available in this e-prints service. This article was originally published following peer-review in Sport psychologist, published by and copyright Human Kinetics.
ISSN:
0888-4781
EISSN:
1543-2793

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMaganaris, Constantinos N.-
dc.contributor.authorCollins, David J.-
dc.contributor.authorSharp, Martin-
dc.date.accessioned2007-08-15T12:24:31Z-
dc.date.available2007-08-15T12:24:31Z-
dc.date.issued2000-09-
dc.identifier.citationSport psychologist, 2000, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 272-278en
dc.identifier.issn0888-4781-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2173/13266-
dc.descriptionFull-text of this article is not available in this e-prints service. This article was originally published following peer-review in Sport psychologist, published by and copyright Human Kinetics.en
dc.description.abstractAlthough expectancy has been shown to play a role in the effect of Anabolic Steroids (AS) on behavior, little research has been completed on the potential for parallel effects on performance. This is an important area for investigation because if expectancy effects can be shown to operate by improvements in performance through the administration of a placebo, arguments against the use of AS may be more successfully advanced. Accordingly, the present investigation used the administration of a placebo (saccharine) with competitive power lifters, using false information about the nature of the drug to delineate expectancy effects. The pervasiveness of these effects was further examined by disclosing the true nature of the drug to half of the participants, midway through the investigation. Notable improvements in performance associated with the belief that AS had been administered largely dissipated when athletes were informed as to the true nature of the drug. Results indicated that expectancy played a notable role in performance enhancement. Implications for this work include more effective use of such investigations in the fight against doping in sport.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHuman Kineticsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.humankinetics.com/TSPen
dc.titleExpectancy effects and strength training: do steroids make a difference?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1543-2793-
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