Diegetic theatre as a ‘place’ for the theatricalised spectator

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2173/188469
Title:
Diegetic theatre as a ‘place’ for the theatricalised spectator
Authors:
Turner, Jane C.
Citation:
Platform, 2011, vol. 6, no. 1
Publisher:
Universiity of London, Royal Holloway, Department of Drama & Theatre
Publication Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2173/188469
Additional Links:
http://www.rhul.ac.uk/dramaandtheatre/platform/home.aspx; http://www.rhul.ac.uk/dramaandtheatre/documents/pdf/platform/61/5diegetictheatre.pdf
Abstract:
This article explores two theatre events that are considered here as examples of diegetic theatre. The two events, Iris Brunette (2009) by Melanie Wilson and Whisper (2008) by Proto-type Theatre have been selected as they both use narration as a strategy to create an „immersive‟ theatre experience, specifically second person narrative. They are positioned here as examples of diegetic as opposed to mimetic theatre. The „immersive‟ experience is achieved by offering the spectator a position of participant observer, a position whereby the spectator is positioned physically inside the fictional matrix as an active participant as well as critically outside the theatrical event as an active observer. This immersive „place‟ might have the potential to create a sense of interplay and connectedness between spectators and performers that resonates experientially for the spectator, but also has the effect of opening up a critical space where the spectator can evaluate the fictional world and „characters‟ encountered. The article will initially draw on ideas derived from Kristeva, as well as Lehmann and Pavis, to contextualise the theatre events whilst also engaging with ideas drawn from narratology.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Full text of this article is available at http://www.rhul.ac.uk/dramaandtheatre/documents/pdf/platform/61/5diegetictheatre.pdf
ISSN:
1751-0171

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Jane C.en
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-02T16:03:55Z-
dc.date.available2011-11-02T16:03:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationPlatform, 2011, vol. 6, no. 1en
dc.identifier.issn1751-0171-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2173/188469-
dc.descriptionFull text of this article is available at http://www.rhul.ac.uk/dramaandtheatre/documents/pdf/platform/61/5diegetictheatre.pdfen
dc.description.abstractThis article explores two theatre events that are considered here as examples of diegetic theatre. The two events, Iris Brunette (2009) by Melanie Wilson and Whisper (2008) by Proto-type Theatre have been selected as they both use narration as a strategy to create an „immersive‟ theatre experience, specifically second person narrative. They are positioned here as examples of diegetic as opposed to mimetic theatre. The „immersive‟ experience is achieved by offering the spectator a position of participant observer, a position whereby the spectator is positioned physically inside the fictional matrix as an active participant as well as critically outside the theatrical event as an active observer. This immersive „place‟ might have the potential to create a sense of interplay and connectedness between spectators and performers that resonates experientially for the spectator, but also has the effect of opening up a critical space where the spectator can evaluate the fictional world and „characters‟ encountered. The article will initially draw on ideas derived from Kristeva, as well as Lehmann and Pavis, to contextualise the theatre events whilst also engaging with ideas drawn from narratology.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversiity of London, Royal Holloway, Department of Drama & Theatreen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.rhul.ac.uk/dramaandtheatre/platform/home.aspxen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.rhul.ac.uk/dramaandtheatre/documents/pdf/platform/61/5diegetictheatre.pdfen
dc.titleDiegetic theatre as a ‘place’ for the theatricalised spectatoren
dc.typeArticleen
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