Between identification and subjectification: affective technologies of expertise and temporality in the contemporary cultural representation of gendered childhoods

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2173/238235
Title:
Between identification and subjectification: affective technologies of expertise and temporality in the contemporary cultural representation of gendered childhoods
Authors:
Burman, Erica
Citation:
Pedagogy, Culture & Society, 2012, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 295-315
Publisher:
Routledge
Issue Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2173/238235
DOI:
10.1080/14681366.2012.688767
Additional Links:
http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/14681366.asp
Abstract:
This article explores political ambiguities surrounding the mutual implication between technology and subjectivity, through the analysis of recent cultural texts about childhood. These ambiguities are shown to rely upon the mobilisation of memory and assume specific gendered forms. The appeal to the past figured by the child is also shown to install a normative developmental trajectory alongside the motif of technology signalling a marked ‘break’ with the past. Whether conceived as technologically savvy or as post-natural romantic, it seems that the (male) child persists as a key counterpart to the – currently economically displaced and emotionally de-skilled – adult male. The argument is elaborated through analysis of popular cultural texts which – crossing genres, contexts and a five-year period – form an arena through which the themes of expertise, technology and gendered idea-typical modes of childhood can be explored. Juxtaposition between the three UK texts and an Indian text suggests that memorial identifications (facilitated by gendered continuities within a particularly conservative rendering of identification), may offer possibilities of a redemptive position, as well as new sites of regulation (and market exploitation). This, however, like the UK varieties, is at the cost of limiting utopian subjective possibilities to traditional narratives of development and gender (hetero)normativity.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Full-text of this article is not available in this e-prints service. This article was originally published following peer-review in Pedagogy, Culture and Society, published by and copyright Routledge.
ISSN:
1468-1366; 1747-5104

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBurman, Ericaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-13T13:58:46Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-13T13:58:46Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationPedagogy, Culture & Society, 2012, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 295-315en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1468-1366-
dc.identifier.issn1747-5104-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14681366.2012.688767-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2173/238235-
dc.descriptionFull-text of this article is not available in this e-prints service. This article was originally published following peer-review in Pedagogy, Culture and Society, published by and copyright Routledge.en_GB
dc.description.abstractThis article explores political ambiguities surrounding the mutual implication between technology and subjectivity, through the analysis of recent cultural texts about childhood. These ambiguities are shown to rely upon the mobilisation of memory and assume specific gendered forms. The appeal to the past figured by the child is also shown to install a normative developmental trajectory alongside the motif of technology signalling a marked ‘break’ with the past. Whether conceived as technologically savvy or as post-natural romantic, it seems that the (male) child persists as a key counterpart to the – currently economically displaced and emotionally de-skilled – adult male. The argument is elaborated through analysis of popular cultural texts which – crossing genres, contexts and a five-year period – form an arena through which the themes of expertise, technology and gendered idea-typical modes of childhood can be explored. Juxtaposition between the three UK texts and an Indian text suggests that memorial identifications (facilitated by gendered continuities within a particularly conservative rendering of identification), may offer possibilities of a redemptive position, as well as new sites of regulation (and market exploitation). This, however, like the UK varieties, is at the cost of limiting utopian subjective possibilities to traditional narratives of development and gender (hetero)normativity.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/14681366.aspen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Pedagogy, Culture & Societyen_GB
dc.titleBetween identification and subjectification: affective technologies of expertise and temporality in the contemporary cultural representation of gendered childhoodsen
dc.typeArticleen
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