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espace at MMU > Research Institutes > Research Institute for Health and Social Change > Qualitative Research, Subjectivity and Critical Theory > Regulation and risk in social work: the general social care council and the social care register in context

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2173/86128
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Title: Regulation and risk in social work: the general social care council and the social care register in context
Authors: McLaughlin, Kenneth
Citation: British journal of social work, 2007, vol. 37, no. 7, pp. 1263-1277
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Issue Date: Oct-2007
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2173/86128
DOI: 10.1093/bjsw/bcl079
Additional Links: http://bjsw.oxfordjournals.org/
Abstract: The 2000 Care Standards Act led to the setting up the General Social Care Council (GSCC) as the new governing professional body for social workers and other social care employees in England.1 The GSCC published national Codes of Practice for social care staff and their employers in 2002, whilst 1 April 2003 saw the introduction of the Social Care Register. The stated aim of these developments is to protect the public, improve the quality of care offered by social workers and increase public confidence in the profession. However, such intentions disguise the increase in regulatory control that the GSCC and social care employers have gained over the workforce—intrusions that have met relatively little criticism. By locating these developments within a broader social context, one in which risk and its management are at the forefront of contemporary social policy and practice, this paper argues that underlying the debate is a climate of fear and distrust in which there is a tendency to view people as either vulnerable, dangerous or both. Such a degraded view of the subjects of social work also pertains to social workers themselves, who are simultaneously seen as assessors of risk, at risk and as a risk.
Type: Article
Language: en
Description: This metadata relates to an article accepted for publication in British Journal of Social Work following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version [Regulation and Risk in Social Work: The General Social Care Council and the Social Care Register in Context, 2007, vol. 37, no. 7, pp. 1263-1277] is available online at: http://bjsw.oxfordjournals.org/
Keywords: Risk
Regulation
Vulnerability
ISSN: 0045-3102
1468-263X
Appears in Collections: Qualitative Research, Subjectivity and Critical Theory

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