2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/2173/86193
Title:
Barriers to networking for women in a UK professional service
Authors:
Tonge, Jane
Citation:
Gender in management, 2008, vol. 23, no. 7, pp. 484-505
Publisher:
Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/2173/86193
DOI:
10.1108/17542410810908848
Additional Links:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/wimr.htm
Abstract:
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of personal contact networks in the UK public relations sector, focusing on the barriers to networking identified by practitioners. Design/methodology/approach – Empirical research using qualitative methodologies of in-depth interviews and repertory grids conducted with directors, managers and executives in seven UK public relations agencies. Findings – UK public relations practitioners in the study may face up to 17 barriers to networking drivers and actions. Three types of barriers emerged–psychological, situational and social. Female practitioners identified all 17 barriers to networking, whereas men identified seven. Research limitations/implications – An insight into the differences in men and women's networking experiences in a growing professional service, especially those negatively influencing their activities. Gender differences are identified and the apparent exclusion from power networks, especially of younger females. Practical implications – UK public relations practitioners may be hindered in the key managerial area of networking, with women perceiving themselves to face more barriers than men. This poses challenges for practitioners to overcome such obstacles, especially for women in this female-dominated industry. Consultancies must consider remedial strategies to counter barriers their employees face, or potentially limit their access to resources and influence which personal networks can bring. Originality/value – The paper is one of the first studies into personal contact networks in the UK public relations industry. It reveals the extent to which both men and women in this professional service face barriers to networking. The paper identifies that women in particular may experience more than twice as many barriers as male counterparts and suggests younger women may be being placed at a disadvantage.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Full-text of this article is not available in this e-prints service. This article was originally published following peer-review in Gender in Management, published by and copyright Emerald.
Keywords:
Employee involvement; Gender; Professional services; Public relations; Social networks; United Kingdom
ISSN:
1754-2413

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTonge, Janeen
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-13T16:03:16Z-
dc.date.available2009-11-13T16:03:16Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationGender in management, 2008, vol. 23, no. 7, pp. 484-505en
dc.identifier.issn1754-2413-
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/17542410810908848-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2173/86193-
dc.descriptionFull-text of this article is not available in this e-prints service. This article was originally published following peer-review in Gender in Management, published by and copyright Emerald.en
dc.description.abstractPurpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of personal contact networks in the UK public relations sector, focusing on the barriers to networking identified by practitioners. Design/methodology/approach – Empirical research using qualitative methodologies of in-depth interviews and repertory grids conducted with directors, managers and executives in seven UK public relations agencies. Findings – UK public relations practitioners in the study may face up to 17 barriers to networking drivers and actions. Three types of barriers emerged–psychological, situational and social. Female practitioners identified all 17 barriers to networking, whereas men identified seven. Research limitations/implications – An insight into the differences in men and women's networking experiences in a growing professional service, especially those negatively influencing their activities. Gender differences are identified and the apparent exclusion from power networks, especially of younger females. Practical implications – UK public relations practitioners may be hindered in the key managerial area of networking, with women perceiving themselves to face more barriers than men. This poses challenges for practitioners to overcome such obstacles, especially for women in this female-dominated industry. Consultancies must consider remedial strategies to counter barriers their employees face, or potentially limit their access to resources and influence which personal networks can bring. Originality/value – The paper is one of the first studies into personal contact networks in the UK public relations industry. It reveals the extent to which both men and women in this professional service face barriers to networking. The paper identifies that women in particular may experience more than twice as many barriers as male counterparts and suggests younger women may be being placed at a disadvantage.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Ltd.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/wimr.htmen
dc.subjectEmployee involvementen
dc.subjectGenderen
dc.subjectProfessional servicesen
dc.subjectPublic relationsen
dc.subjectSocial networksen
dc.subjectUnited Kingdomen
dc.titleBarriers to networking for women in a UK professional serviceen
dc.typeArticleen
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